On Tuesday, Sergeant Perez of the Houston Police Department drowned while driving about 16-and-a-half feet underpass after the devastation that Hurrican Harvey left in Houston, Texas.

Due to the darkness, Perez was not able to see clearly, thus driving into the waters, according to Police Chief Art Acevedo. Perez’s body was found the following day.

SB 4 Laws Make People Afraid To Seek Shelter. Hurricane Harvey

SB 4 laws permits police officers to inquire from the immigrants they detain about their immigration status. SB 4 law started operating on Friday. Before the law, one had to be jailed or imprisoned to give such information.

Following the implementation of SB 4 law, many immigrants are worried. They’re highly concerned about leaving their flooded neighborhoods and homes to go to look for shelter.

But Chief Acevedo and Mayor Sylvester Turner told those who are undocumented, not to fear to leave their homes to seek shelter.

People are reiterating because SB 4 law has created a lot of fear of failing to return to their homes when normality resumes.

Turner and Acevedo decided to take the step of encouraging people because some resident would even die in their homes, while avoiding to leave their homes, in fear to return afterward.

What is Fiel: Hurrican Harvey Aftermath

Cesar Espinosa comes from FIEL, and he works with the undocumented immigrants. FIEL is helping in evacuating people to safety.

FIEL team is present in those facilities, where folks are being relocated to. They are providing shelter and helping the law informant officials in the rescue process.

Law enforcement officers are urging the immigrants not to be afraid of seeking assistance despite the anti-sanctuary law. Art Acevedo specifically spoke against SB4.

“Many of us can’t actually implement this law without racially profiling,” Acevedo said. “Therefore, don’t bother anybody asking for immigration status. It isn’t in the best interest. And we are not just interested in knowing it.”

6000 Inmates Have Been Evacuated Due To Hurricane Harvey

Hurricane Harvey has resulted in the evacuation of about 6000 inmates in at least five prisons in Texas.

The ‘Harris County Sheriff’s Office’ tweeted on Tuesday that despite the flooding, Harris County Jail had not been evacuated. The Harris County Jail is located next to Buffalo Bayou in downtown, Houston.

The office went on claiming that all the inmates were “safe and accounted for.” And that “the jails have food, water, AC, and medical accessibility.”

The office also said that the inmates had easy access to the phone lines to contact their loved ones. The tweet even cited, a private company, Securus, which provides phone services.

Securus was said to have waived the jail calling charges for more than 8,000 inmates, to contact their loved ones.

However, one inmate from The Harris County Jail facilities, Nanon Williams, called home saying that they were very close to the waters.

Williams, with his colleagues, were specifically in Brazoria County—where reports showed the nearby river being flooded to the extreme.

Williams and other inmates had started seeing the water coming up close to the prisons when they decided to call home.

They used the prison phones to contact their loved ones saying, “People are not evacuating us. We, therefore, urge you to blow the whistle by making calls and raising concerns.”

Luckily, that worked out, and now some of those prisons have been evacuated.

 

Hurricane Harvey has prompted at least five Texas prisons to evacuate nearly 6,000 inmates, and on Tuesday the Harris County Sheriff’s Office tweeted that their jail next to the swollen Buffalo Bayou in downtown Houston had not been evacuated. Meanwhile, law enforcement officials are urging immigrants not to fear seeking help despite an anti-sanctuary law set to take effect on Friday. We get an update from criminal justice correspondent Renée Feltz.

Stay Up to Date with Hurrican Harvey News Regarding Prisoners and Immigrants and Comment in the Section Below to Share Your Stories, Prayers, and More….

Daniel Peterson is a young professional with diverse experience in content writing and content management. He has a strong blog writing background, and runs his own e-commerce partnership business. Daniel currently writes news articles for prison loved ones on the Prison Rideshare Network.